WORLD BANK

WORLD BANK

The World Bank is an international financial institution that provides loans to countries of the world for capital projects. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the International Development Association. The World Bank is a component of the World Bank Group.

The post-secondary level is where a stark gender gap emerges for STEM education. Globally there are more women enrolled than men in universities and graduation rates for women are higher. However, Sub-Saharan Africa is an exception.

 

Despite higher rates of enrollment and graduation at a global level, women are less likely to major in specific STEM fields. Only 7% of women choose to study engineering, manufacturing and construction, compared to 22% of men. Of the students pursuing careers in information, communication and technology (ICT) fields, 28% are women and 72% are men.

www.worldbank.org

KFW

KFW

The KfW, formerly KfW Bankengruppe, is a German government-owned development bank, based in Frankfurt. Its name originally comes from Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau. It was formed in 1948 after World War II as part of the Marshall Plan. As of 2018, it is Germany’s third-largest bank by balance sheet.

Development aid

KfW Entwicklungsbank (KfW Development Bank) provides financing to governments, public enterprises and commercial banks engaged in microfinance and SME promotion in developing countries. It does so through loans close to market terms using its own resources (“promotional loans”), soft loans that blend KfW resources with support from the federal government’s aid budget (“development loans”), as well as highly subsidized loans and grants, the latter two coming entirely from the federal aid budget. Different country groups are offered different financing conditions depending mainly on their per capita income. All these financing instruments are part of what is officially called development cooperation and is more commonly called “development aid“.

In German aid, the work of KfW Development Bank is called “financial cooperation” which is complemented by “technical cooperation” by GIZ and other public agencies. The main sectors of financial cooperation are water supply and sanitation, renewable energy and energy efficiency, as well as the development of the financial sector. KfW Development Bank also works, among other sectors, in health, education, agriculture, forestry, solid waste management. It provided €7.4 billion in loans and grants in 2014

 

www.kfw.de

AfDB

AfDB

Ghana Economic Outlook

After two years of sluggish growth from 2014 to 2016, real GDP growth recovered to 8.5% in 2017 and was estimated to be 6.2% in 2018, driven mainly by the oil sector. The fiscal account deficit improved marginally, from 5.9% in 2017 to an estimated 5.7% in 2018, as did the current account deficit, from 4.5% in 2017 to an estimated 4.4% in 2018.

The primary World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially-recognized international sources. It presents the most current and accurate global development data available and includes national, regional and global estimates. Note: Even though Global Development Finance (GDF) is no longer listed in the WDI database name and bulk download file names, all external debt and financial flows data continue to be included in WDI. The GDF publication has been renamed International Debt Statistics (IDS), and has its own separate database, as well

www.afdb.org

JICA

UNESCO-UNEVOC

Ghana is a country renowned for its political and social stability. Ghana has held six peaceful and democratic elections including two changes in administration, and the country is praised as a model of African democracy in the international community.

The start of oil production in 2010 has invited an increased volume of foreign investment and stimulated a higher level of economic activity, enabling Ghana to maintain a high growth rate in recent years. However, various challenges remain, including regional disparities, and inadequate infrastructure and public services.

In order to consolidate Ghana’s stable socioeconomic development process, it is crucial to overcome these issues. To support Ghana in its effort, JICA’s cooperation is primarily focused on 1) agriculture (rice cultivation); 2) economic infrastructure (electricity and transport); 3) health and science/mathematics education; and 4) capacity development in administrative and financial management.

www.jica.go.jp

UNESCO-UNEVOC

UNESCO-UNEVOC

Who we are

UNESCO-UNEVOC is UNESCO’s specialized Centre for technical and vocational education and training (TVET). It assists UNESCO’s 195 member states to strengthen and upgrade their TVET systems.

UNESCO, together with the UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), the UNESCO Office in Myanmar, and the GIZ, is supporting the Ministry of Education (MOE) of Myanmar in its efforts to enhance quality provisions, the access of young people to TVET and the effective governance of TVET systems and institutions.

The UNEVOC Centre in Magdeburg, Germany, in collaboration with the Federal Ministry for Economic Development and Cooperation (BMZ), organized an International Experts Meeting on “TVET, Digitalization, Work 4.0 – Consequences for Learning and Working in the Informal Sector”.

World TVET Database

The World Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Database is an online repository developed by UNESCO-UNEVOC, aimed at providing concise, reliable and up-to-date information on TVET systems worldwide.

The Country Profiles are the result of a collaboration between UNESCO-UNEVOC and the TVET stakeholders in each country, particularly the UNEVOC Network Members. These also include collaborations with regional stakeholders, such as SEAMEO-VOCTECH for 11 countries in South East Asia.

We are in the process of updating the information provided in the Country Profiles for all Member States. The updated Country Profiles will be made available on an ongoing basis.

Contributing to the World TVET Database

Should you wish to support the development of a profile for your country, or have feedback on the content and structure of the database, please contact us at unevoc.tvetprofiles(at)unesco.org

To access a report, please click on the PDF signs below. Some reports are also available in French (FR), Spanish (SP), Chinese (CH) or Arabic (AR).

(NOTE: The newly launched Country Profiles are currently only available in English. The translated versions of these profiles will be published shortly.)

For any comments or feedback, please feel free to get in touch with us at unevoc.tvetprofiles(at)unesco.org

 

www.unevoc.org